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clout with congress. the goal: a sweeping deficit agreement to avert $650 billion in spending cuts and tax increases at the start of 2013. from the white house came word that president obama will try to build public pressure on congress to raise taxes on the wealthy and prevent tax hikes for everyone else. white house spokesman jay carney. >> well, the president believes very strongly that the american people matter in this debate. because this debate is about them. the question of whether or not taxes go up on 98% of american tax payers is a very important to ordinary americans. it is not just a matter for discussion between the president and the senate minority leader. or other congressional leaders. >> brown: to that end the president met privately today with small business owners. on friday he'll travel to the philadelphia area to speak further on the issue. not to be outdone, house republicans said they'll meet with small business owners and workers in their districts arguing against the president's plan. in the senate republican my ontario leader mitch mcconnell dismissed the
social security off the table for the current fiscal cliff and deficit discussion, but be very honest about what we're going to achieve in the near term. >> reporter: republicans pushed back, arguing social security is part of the deficit problem because it is no longer taking in enough in taxes to cover the benefits it pays out. social security makes up the difference by cashing in special treasury bonds it holds in its trust fund. but conservatives point out the money to redeem those bonds comes from taxpayers. >> it is money that is coming out of general revenue that is going into social security that reduces the amount of revenue that is available for everything from aircraft carriers and roads to environmental issues. >> reporter: legally, social security is off-budget, meaning its cash flow is not considered part of the budget deficit. and defenders argue the money used to pay off the special treasury bonds in the social security trust fund are no different than the money owed to any other bond holder. >> we're using social security as a piggy bank to deal with the problems in t
should address the drivers of the deficit. social security is not currently a driver of the deficit. that's an economic pact. while the president supports engaging with congress on a separate tract to strengthen social security, for entitlements we need to look at medicare and medicaid. >> joining to us talk about that and more is alan krueger, chairman of the council of economic advisers. can you help us interpret what jay carney just said? a lot of republicans have gone into this debate and discussion saying, you want more in taxes but in the same time we have to have entitlement reform. is he taking that off the table, mr. krueger? >> the president has pursued a balanced approach all along. he's had entitlement reform on the table. if you look at budgets, there are tough decisions there relating to health care costs, which are driving our deficits. additional revenue from upper income earners. >> medicare is still on the table when it comes to discussions about the fiscal cliff but not social security? what exactly are we talking about? >> as jay carney said, social security is not a d
term -- deficit reduction -- that is important to america's credibility. it is important for america's economy and economic growth. that plan has to be balanced, and that means significant revenues and that paying has to go around. that means the wealthy and well-off have to pay their fair share as well. these should not be new issues. they are ones that were debated. they came up in every debate -- even the foreign policy debate. the american people are on the side of the president and democrats who are making this case. that is not to say that there should not be spending as part as this debate. there has been over $1 trillion in spending cuts. that is a part of this debate that gets lost. just because washington has a short memory does not mean we should all have one and that there has already been sacrifice on behalf of the american people through those domestic discretionary cuts. we are excited. c.a.p. has been a lot of work on the fiscal cliff. we have talked about medicare savings that can improve and strengthen the program and address rising national health expenditures. we
japan in a trade deficit for the fourth straight month. finance ministry officials released preliminary figures shortly before the markets opened. the deficit came in at $6.7 billion. exports fell by 6.5% from a year earlier. exports have fallen five months in a row. cars and steel led the drop and imports fell by 1.6% from a year earlier. exports to europe tumbled more than 20%. the debt crisis has dampened demand. exports to china fell more than 11%. consumers upset about the material -- territorial dispute are shying away from japanese goods. >>> serieses say the settlement body upheld most of the -- wto officials sent a final report to the parties involved. the document advises ontario to rer rectify the issue. the wto says the -- canadian officials may appeal the decision. >>> tokyo stock exchange officials are calling on small businesses in south korea to list their shares on the tokyo boards. the tse made the promotion in a seminar in seoul on wednesday. the event was held by an organization that helps enterprises to raise funds and enter foreign markets. more than 200 south kore
to hammer out a deal on the greek deficit. prime minister says they're cle. politicians are considering a debt forgiveness program but could see talso reaching agreement on a framework for the planned eurozone banking union. speaking to the ft, the eu internal markets commissioner said ministers must meet a december deadline in order to placate financial markets. and this as in spain voters in cat take loan i can't giving a victory to the separatist party, but the region's president lost ground. so what does it mean for the push for independence and the deficit reduction plans? julia is in barcelona for us. what does it all mean? >> it's being seen as broadly positive because it weekens his push for independence in the region right now. but the overriding message is that two thirds of the people that voted here voted for pro nationalist or separationist parties here. and this is a sentiment that's been growing over a number of years. and the president has to try to align himselves with other parties bearing two key facts, where does he take the push for a referendum, how does that influ
it into the unified budget to mass of the overall deficit. the trust fund will run -- to mask the overall deficit. it was a nice tax breaks for low income seniors. that was stealing from that trust fund. we call it the social security fund. there is no trust in my estimation. host: this is from the huffy to post a business section. earlier this week-- huffington post business section. older americans are in the cross hairs. when congress returns for a lame-duck session, stocks will keep up -- talks will heat up and there may be reinvigorated discussions on a grand bargain. the last time that happens, president obama considered a proposal favored by republicans to extend the eligibility for medicare to 67. as a guy who turned 65, your thoughts about extending the eligibility for medicaid to 67. guest: if you are younger, you are not thinking about it. i think it would be prudent to do that for the health of the country in the future of the people. obviously, if you are at or near 65, you cannot do it. the thing i wonder is, as part of this whole situation, why is there no effort to really, really
" and he joins me now. thanks for being with us now. we appreciate it. you compare the deficit to an insurance policy. you say it doesn't make you any richer in the short-term, but in the long-term, it is helpful. i want to actually put your statements up. you say let's agree to keep deficits very high for at least another year. and then let's buy an insurance policy against that debt crisis when we can really afford it. so lots of republicans and democrats out there would disagree greatly with you. say that america's ability to pay its debt is really important. how would you respond to them? >> right. i do think that there's a thing that's taken place in washington deficit reduction will stimulate us to enormous growth in 2013. the fact is what deficit reduction is, is tax increases and spending cuts, both of which take economic activity out of the economy. so this really is extremely similar to insurance. if i buy, say, flood insurance. what i'm doing is i'm paying a short premium in the short-term, to protect my house in the long-term. that's exactly what deficit reduction i
box and reduce the deficit, they spent it. he has no savings in his budget. he wants to count savings because he is not in iraq anymore. they threw him out. that is why he is not in iraq anymore. connell: we will obviously come back to this over and over again. grover norquist, thank you. dagen: we will stay on the topic of warren buffett and taxes. should the cut off the $500,000 not $250,000 as the president wants. would that ease some of the burden and pain of higher taxes? >> on one level it would, of course. raising that threshold from $250,000 to $500,000. the buffet idea maybe release a little bit of pain, but does nothing to address the extortions that he is talking about. huge distortions. 160,000 pages of distortions in the tax code. you were talking about a tiny, tiny improvement. i will take it, sure. we are getting distracted on this one. dagen: connell was talking about a minimum tax on the wealthy. he starts out $1 billion a year. 30%. a good idea in the abstract? then he starts talking about his brother in. those are multi billionaires, dude. >> i mean, i think these a
down deficit. the campaign promise is to cut the deficit in half. he said he would do it by focusing at the center of his proposal, going to be entitlement reform. we have seen none of that. more than four years. >> bret: interesting op-ed by bill archer and chris cox in "wall street journal" saying that the real outlay is $86 trillion of unfunded liabilities. obligations when you include all of the federal government, what it owes. that is obviously dwarfs the $16 trillion in debt we hold. >> which raises the question why are republicans allowing the entire debate to be about taxes? and about the war among republicans over holding the line on the norquist pledge or not. when what obama is proposing on raising the rates on the 2% is a triviality. it will reduce the deficit from $11.01 trillion to $1. $1.02 trillion. eight cents on the dollar. nothing. lunch money. it's rounding error. yet that is all the debate we are hearing. obama understands this. he is trying to, he is not trying to fix our fiscal issues and problems. he's trying to destroy the republicans. by insisting that ther
senator pat toomey from pennsylvania. he was a member of the deficit reduction super committee last year that failed to agree on a plan. but he's been talking about this issue for a long, long time. good morning, senator. >> good morning. >> we just learned that president obama will be traveling to your backyard on friday to talk about the fiscal cliff and spending, and traveling to pennsylvania right now. is this a welcome visit as far as you're earned? >> as far as i'm concerned the president of the united states is always welcome in my state of pennsylvania. we welcome the president and look forward to his message, and i have some questions i'd like to-ish i hope he addresses. >> what questions? >> first of all the president seems absolutely determined to inflict a tax increase on the american people. two years ago he signed a bill that extended the current tax rates for two more years because he said the last thing you want to do is raise taxes in a weak economy. today the economy is weaker than it was two years ago. why in the world does he want to inflict that damage now? >> senato
deficits close to 4% to 5% over the next decade and that's cbo forecasts. if that occurs, you're talk about the debt getting more and more out of control. because the u.s. is the global reserve council, it's reliant on global reserve investment. >> just want to make sure that people have enough treasuries to trade. that's all it's about, charles. isn't that very generous? >> it is very generous. but left unaddressed, the fiscal problem is beginning to be a problem. but equally they don't want the full hit at this stage. so it is a matter of coming to some compromise, so you are going to have to see some kind of adjustment on the taxation side. that is what everyone is hopeful for. but it's still a political game. >> and we've been burned before. let's recap in the meantime a couple of developments in europe overnight. the european commission is expected to approve the restructuring plans of spags's na -- spain's national lenders today. a token price of -- yes -- one euro. the valencia-based lank was one of four to be nationalized in the past 12 months. and hundreds of greek workers marched
krugman sounded a different note today in the "times" and is talking about this idea that cutting deficits is a number one priority. he writes supposedly any day now investors will lose faith in america's ability to come to grips with its budgets failures. when they do there will be a run on treasury bonds, interest will spike and the u.s. economy will plunge back into recession. this sounds plausible to many people because it's roughly speaking what happened to greece but we're not greece. he's saying while this is a real dynamic for some countries, it is not because of the way we fund ourselves, is that right, ben? >> that's right. i would say morning munnize not actually by given name. >> i didn't know that. >> he's right, we're not greece, we're a much larger economy. we can grow our way out of debts and deficits. we've got a ginormous economy. we had a huge black friday weekend. probably $600 billion for the total shopping over the holidays. the question is, as we get close and getting into december, if it looks like talks are breaking down and we have the same old lines on no tax inc
to these problems and a recognition that a balanced approach to deficit reduction is the right approach. it's the one most beneficial for our economy. >> reporter: the president's trying to take advantage of that different tone. he talked to speaker boehner over the weekend by telephone. and today you've had two business leaders, john engler, tom donahue, in to meet with senior white house officials. they're trying to keep this going. aides on capitol hill tell me no substantive progress in negotiations just yet. they're just now getting back to work after thanksgiving. >> how does that make you feel about the market? does it make you feel like they have more kum-bi-ya going on in washington, d.c.? does it make you more willing to invest? >> i'll tell you what. i saw spielberg's "lincoln" over the weekend and it was incredible because it reminded me how nothing has changed on capitol hill. >> i agree with you 150%. >> in 150 years. >> don't you get tired of everybody saying, oh, washington is a mess right now. it's never been this bad. it's always been this bad. you see that in the movie. >
exports. trade balance in october marked the largest deficit on record for that month. >>> now let's take a look at how stocks are performing. tokyo share prices are recovering this thursday morning to the 9,300 level for the first time since early may. the key nikkei index at 9318. that's a gain of over 1% so far in the day. analysts say that market players are buying export-related shares as the yen weakens. investors have high hopes for an earnings recovery of exporters. an overnight rise on wall street, that also is helping push shares up here in tokyo. let's take a look at other markets that are open this hour. in south korea, the kospi is trading higher by almost .8%, currently 1898. let's take a look at australia. the benchmark index there is trading well over 1%. 1.3% at 4426. >>> ministers from japan and south korea are discussing a broad range of economic issues. japan apparently hopes that the two countries will reassert the imrtance of their economic ties and that's despite a souring in their political relations due to a territorial dispute. the working-level talks in seoul on
is that although it's running a primary deficit, actual servicing makes if worse. so one thing you can do is take away some of the debt burden to enable them to try to get the economy back into some sort of primary surface situation. but imagine we have a baby crawling across the floor and it keeps crawling away from us. we're picking up up the baby and bringing it back closer to us, but it's still crawling. so as soon as you put it down, it's heads off back where it came from. so the real problem with greece, they say the good news is we'll stay in the euro. really? the problem for greece is that greece in the euro appears to be uncompetitive. you either come out of the euro, and you have big significant drop in the value of your currency so everything that you do, no one would seem there is much change in import costs, but suddenly everything in greece is more than competitive. but if you stay, instead of the currency dropping 0%, every person's salary has dropped 30%. so this gets much, much harder. >> it's clear the internal devaluation is much more difficult, but also that it has been happen
the bush tax cuts for over $250,000 expire, $80 billion. deficit of $1 trillion a year. you are only 18% of the way. you are still missing 82% of the pie here. that is the number. >> dana: two minutes left, can i ask you one other thing. transparency. some on right try to push for negotiations to be in the public and broadcast on cspan. that is a terrible idea. >> brian: it is terrible idea. the only time they dealt with the sleeves up and working deals out, grant you, eric, you are right. the grand compromise. you talk about stimulus and obamacare and the auto bail-out they did it on their own. president was not engaged. he passed it along. i don't care what harry reid says. medicare and medicaid and social security have to be restructured, not fine tuned. obamacare has to be in play. >> eric: you don't want to see it on c-span? i do. >> andrea: you worked on the hill, i did. we worked in washington. the chances of it really happening on c-span would happen in the men's room and the hallways. call each other after the camera left the room. someone brought this idea to me and it's reall
is an integral part of deficit reduction. yes, from my side of the table bring entitlement reform into the conversation. social security, set aside. doesn't add to the deficit but when it comes to medicare and medicaid, protect the integrity of the program but give it solvency for more and more years. martha: alabama republican jeff sessions is the ranking member on the senate budget committee. senator sessions good morning. good to have you here today. >> martha, thank you. martha: a lot of talk this morning after these sunday shows and watching both sides talk about this fiscal cliff about who seems to be moving and in what direction. what are you hearing, what are you hearing from lindsey graham who says, quote he is willing to break that pledge on taxes under certain circumstances? what are they really saying? >> i'm not sure what they're saying. there's a lot of this talk going on. i don't know who is speaking for the republican party. the house of representatives where you have a substantial republican majority but the truth is that this country does not need to go through t
with an incredible deficit deduction in place. >> i plan to wake up with a big hangover. >> if we would go ahead with sequestration and increase in tax rates, they have to be happy. where is santelli on this? >> he does wear a pin, santelli. it's a good question. >> look, i just think that it is true that january may not be a debacle. as someone that cares about -- let's put my cards on the table. higher stock prices. we ain't going to go in that direction. it's not good for the stock market. >> we hear it all the time from business leaders. i heard it yesterday. head of north american m&a. if you get me a deal, i as ceo am going to make significant decisions that i'm not making now. >> there it is. it's the decisions. it's the decision to hire. decision to invest. it's a little dicey. you don't know what the world is going to look like. i think that the guy i care about may be more than the people meeting with president is jpmorgan head of m&a. these are few and far between. i spoke to ceo of pbh after interview he said i want to make money for shareholders taking advantage of the fact that int
the plan to a bankruptcy judge on friday. sa they need to close a nearly $46 billion budget deficit. new york and new jersey need at least $71.3 billion to recover from the devastation of super storm sandy and prevent similar damage from future storms. this is according to the state's latest estimates. that total of course could grow. steve liesman has been crunching the newspaperup i numbers and hn the next hour. this is to try to build up some sort of protection, some massive floodwalls. governor cuomo was saying this would be like $9.1 billion to start building. >> questions about the future of the sec following mary shapiro's exit. elyse walter could run the agent until december 2013 when she would have to be renominated and reapproved by the senate. among the issues, and ongoing battle over regulating the $2.5 trillion money market fund industry, some 63 unfinished rule making requirements that are all part of dodd-frank and continuing fears of course about market stability and high frequency trading. p. >> money markets used to be covered by the fdic when the crisis first came on.
budget is on an unsustainable path. the budget deficit which peaked at about 10% of gdp in 2009 and now is 7% of gdp is expected to narrow further in the coming years as the economy continues to recover. the cbo projects that under a plausible set of assumptions, the budget deficit would still be greater than 4% of gdp in 2018, assuming the economy has returned with potential by then. moreover, under the cbo projection, could deficit and raise your federal debt to gdp would subsequently returned to an upward trend. we should all understand that long-term projections of ever increasing deficits will never actually come to pass because the willingness of plunder to continue to fund the government can only be sustained by irresponsible fiscal plans and actions. host: that was ben bernanke at the economic club of new york yesterday. looking for your confidence in the u.s. economy. already getting some comments on facebook -- abroad we are taking your comments on twitter, facebook, and calls. we start with joseph from maryland on the democratic line. thanks for joining us. caller: good morni
and we'll have another trillion dollar deficit according to cbo moving into next year and we can't afford anymore like that. if we take what obama would be willing to support which is increase in the age of, again recipients and other type of reforms like that, then we have a legitimate negotiation as we move into it. but when you have liberal members of the democratic party stepping forward and saying before the process begins they will not accept any type of entitlement reform, it makes it untenable process from the beginning. jon: is it no entitlement reform, simon, or is it perhaps entitlement reform when it comes to medicare? i haven't heard anybody talk about reforming social security on democratic side? >> that is good question and i think, look i think we're in the early stages, chris, of this whole debate. eric cantor went on morning joe said and won't raise taxes on anybody under any circumstance which would you argue is stopping negotiations. both sides are laying out positions right now. there are negotiations going on. clearly the fiscal cliff is scaring everybody into action
and says the end for hp is not even sight. >>> also, japan has posted its worst trade deficit in october for more than three decades. exports dropped sharply amid territorial tensions between tokyo and beijing. it indicates the world's third biggest economy is inching closer to recession. this means the country would have seen its fifth technical recession in 15 years. at the same time, japan's opposition party promised a massive easing blitz meant to pull the economy out of its funk. that's if the ldp returns to power on december 16th. he promised to compile a large extra budget. he's also it rated calls to lift calls above the 1% target. >> translator: we should target inflation of 2% to 3%. i prefer 3%, but i will leave that up to the experts. i have never said the boj should directly buy bonds from the government. they should buy them from the market. >> his party is also considering the revision of the bank of japan law. yesterday the bank of japan chief hit back saying it was unrealistic. >>> just the latest in japan. let's get the market report kicked off by sixuan. >> let me star
, will congress be able to reach a fiscal cliff deal that really cuts spending and the deficit? wooohooo....hahaahahaha! oh...there you go. wooohooo....hahaahahaha! i'm gonna stand up to her! no you're not. i know. you know ronny folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico sure are happy. how happy are they jimmy? happier than a witch in a broom factory. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. try running four.ning a restaurant is hard, fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. >>> another busy news day. markets higher right now. we had the cease fire now announced between israel and hamas. if there isn't peace in washington on avoiding a fiscal cliff, will these gains go away in a hurry? >> joining us now, rich bernstein, cnbc contributor, anthony chan, and our own bob posani. bob, so far we've seen, what, t
years. that's significant deficit reduction and you don't have to get into all this michigas as my grandma would say about which loopholes you're going to close. when you go that route you run into the same math problem mitt romney had. there's typically not enough revenue to make up for if the upper -- >> i have seen you do the experiment with the glass and it's wonderful. most americans think washington officials will behave like spoiled children, and warren buffett took the gop to school today, quote, let's forget about the rich and ultra rich going on strike and stuffing their ample funds under their mattresses if, gasp, capital gains rates and ordinary income rates are increased. the ultra rich, including me, says mr. buffett, will forever pursue investment opportunities. so he's calling for a minimum tax on millionaires and billionaires. will republicans listen? >> well, it's a sensible way. if we're going to have a deal, we will have to see some kind of compromise. a minimum tax on people making over $1 million a year can generate a half it trillion in a ten-year scale. if y
viewers to know you have balanced -- balanced two previous budgets if not more, you have closed deficit holes of more than 4 billion dollars. you have had success. >> we went from a 4.2 billion dollars deficit to two one time budgets with no tax increases. but we have pensions that are eating up a good portion of the budget that we're going to have to address. if all of a sudden this federal money that has been coming to the state and going down to the local communities is cut off, we're going to have to sit back and say what services can we provide and what services are going to disappear? but what concerns me more is the unemployment that it's going to create. i think the cbo has said that unemployment could go over 9%. liz: you're ahead of the national average higher actually. >> we created some tax incentives to bring the petrochemical industry, the plastics industry near that facility, that would create thousands of jobs more. we believe we could reindustrialize southwestern and western pennsylvania, if we're able to move this forward, but the economy as you know certainly can have
norquist in july when he agreed to a tax increases in exchange for a grand bargain on the deficit. the other republicaa gang member, senator mike ray powell reportedly indicated earlier that he is open to a range of possible tax rates. now senate is lindsay gramm, john mccain, bob barker along with house majority leader eric cantor and congressman peter king are rebuking the norquist anti-tax pledge, a new gang of six saying in recent days they would break that pledge to look for new ways to generate revenue republican congressman peter king said bluntly, he is not ruling anything out. >> i agree entirely. a pledge to sign 20 years ago, 18 years ago. i think everything should be on the table. lou: two of the senator's not only reversing themselves on raising taxes but also rethinking their opposition to a susan rice secretary of state apartment. senators gramm and mccain both revising their political positions in a bit -- at a breathtaking pace. joining a summer we are calling the republican reset, the fiscal cliff, of course, and the coup in egypt, the president seemingly in sear
dick durbin says medicare and medicaid are fair game in deficit negotiations, but insist social security should be left alone. >> social security does not add one penny to our debt, not a penny. it's a separate funded operation, and we can do things, and i believe we should now, smaller things, played out over the long term that gives it solvency. medicare is another story. only 12 years of solvency lie ahead if we do nothing. so those who say don't touch it, don't change it are ignoring the obvious. >> despite showing willingness for reform -- >> can we talk about that for a second? >> i don't want to repeat what you said. >> it's bull hockey. >> that's not what you said. >> this whole thing has been a complete farce for years. there's no trust fund. they raided that a long time ago. but the bigger point, i will because you know what? my heart has grown like the grinch's since thanksgiving. i have so much to be thankful for. >> it's been growing ever since election day, basically. >> so i'm going to be kind. first of all, senator durbin deserves respect on this front because he
-- or betting there will be a huge issues in the coming years on these -- on the deficit issue, you may want to keep it off the table. >>> there's a third area there. i don't talk to anybody, steve or our guest, who doesn't think the u.s. can easily ramp up growth. the real discussion i don't think is the true u.s. economy. i thinkist the moguling being throw in front of it, our self-inflected issues, you know, last time around we sequestration. are we going to have sequestration 2? of course we'll put a band-aid, but we need leverage to have reform predicated to surrender on the band-aid. >>> we've got to go, guys. i've got to go with this. we've got to move on. this is the last hour of trading, so we've got to move here. thank you for your thoughts today. steve, thank you, you're voting on a committee of politicians. i find hope in that somehow. >> yeah. you're in the hopeful camp. >> hoping at the last moment they will do the right thing. >> was that a pig that just flew by? the market is slowly coming off the lows. >> instead the last time the markets closed in positive territory on blac
could be slapped with new taxes and the state could be thrown into a $11 billion deficit. >> house of representatives could sleet next week. it would expand the number of visas for science and technology students from other countries and make it easier for those students to bring the families to the u.s. house proposal would allow family members to come to the u.s. one year after they applied for the green cards. they say it is a bill to a stepping stone of immigration reform. opponents say the increase for visas for technology student would be upset by eliminating other visa programs. >> it is expected to top the agenda when president obama welcomes mexico's president-elect to the white house this week. he will return to mexico's institutional revolutionary power to party after 12 years when he takes office december 1st. he pushed more nor economic reforms and including overhauls of energy and tax laws. >>> supreme court could decide whether to take up the issue of gay marriage this week. the court is set to hold a closed door conference on friday where they can decide whether the
. >> we know that the only way we can solve our long-term debt and deficit problem is to fix the unsustainable growth rates of our very popular entitlement programs. the president has from time to time indicated an openness to that. now is the time to actually do it. >> 42 business groups sent a letter to leaders of congress asking them to do tax reform to lower tax rates and also address entitlement reforms. >> shepard: democrats say they want more revenue, more taxes here. what about entitlement changes? >> well, any time you start talking about tweaking these programs, there are groups in washington around the country that mobilize to try and stop cuts. the number two senate democrat, dick durbin, says he'd be open to look at entitlements, but not part of the fiscal cliff talks. here is the senate majority leader's view. >> at the meeting we had that i mentioned with president and the four leaders, president obama said that social security is not part of what is what we're going to do in this. i agree with him. and there are things that i personally believe there are thing
large deficits, as well. so the politics in spain slightly skewed as they will be, but not so much pressure on rajoy at the moment. unlikely to ask for assistance in the short term. we also have another euro group meeting take, back in brussels, yes, i know, we seem to have one every week. they may come up with a long term financing deal for greece. finally talking about debt forgiveness in greece which is what we all know has got to happen. whether it can happen before the german elections in the fall next year is a mute point. anyway, that's where we stand. fairly down beat for equities and yields a little bit mixed. back to you. >> all right. thank you very much. let's get back to the fiscal cliff. we've been talking about the issues of taxes. as we mentioned, warren buffett calling for a minimum tax for the wealthy. he starts with suppose that an investor you admire and trust comes to you with an investment idea. this is a good one, he says, i'm in it and i think you should be, too. would your reply possibility be it all depends on what my tax rate will be on the gain you're sa
of the issue. >>> in global market news, japan logging its fourth straight trade deficit in october. the european debt crisis with china over a territorial dispute actually reduced exports. and we continue to follow the latest developments out of the middle east. secretary of state hillary clinton traveled to the west bank this morning to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. abbas heads the west bank, while the palestinian militant group hamas controls the gaza strip. hamas is considered a terrorist organization by the united states because it continues to refuse to recognize israel as a state. the united states has a policy of not negotiating with terrorist organizations. that's why she's not speaking with anyone in gaza. her visit comes hours after a meeting with israeli officials that lasted late into the night. >>> let's take a look at the markets this morning. we already showed you the futures. they are down slightly. dow futures down by about 23 points. in europe this morning, you'll see that -- also, by the way, a lot happened yesterday. ben bernanke started talking
% of the taxpayers and it's maybe $5 billion to $10 billion a year. relative to a $1 trillion deficit -- not saying it's nothing, but it's just such a tiny amount -- >> people at his income level are paying that. >> i have to say, if we're going to have a big tax debate, let's have one that really matters, now about this warren buffett rule which won't raise enough revenue to make a dime's worth of difference whether it comes to the federal budget. let's figure out what do we want to use our tax code for and what do we have to change to make it do that. >> let's move on to the next one which would put you in -- give you a real tax problem here. the powerball jackpot set for a record $425 million this wednesday. no winner over the weekend. what would you do with a half billion that came as a windfall to you? >> first thing i'd do, i'd give everybody i know a lot of money and say don't come back again. here you go. i'm going to seed all your brilliant ideas but that's all you get. second, i think i would look for -- a lot like peter thiel has done, look for underinvested ideas, writers, artists, tech
programs. only 38% think it's going to actually reduce the deficit. so, here we've got a debt problem, some would say a crisis, and people are just not confident that we're going to address it, certainly not with new taxes. >> well, that's right. and look, skepticism about politicians is as old an as america, part of our cultural dna. in fact, i was surprised only 4% think this'll spend the money instead of using it as they promise. and one of the other things that we're seeing and i think this is really important in these discussions, if you ask people about across the board spending cuts, what everything is included, everything is on the cable. 65% say that's a good idea. but if you take something off the table and say, cut everything, but the military, support falls to 42%, so americans want to make sure that this is not something that singles out a pet project for exemption and protection. >> if people think like this about the future of health care and think like this about debt. how come they reelected president obama? how did this happen? >> well, to some degree they didn't think it'
to see them try different things. first of all, let's recognize the fact that we had the deficits right now as a result of obama's budget. that's $5.3 trillion. that's in his budget. he signed that. we have a lot of the programs that should be undone. give you an example, we had a democrat president back in the '90s, bill clinton, while we had a republican majority in the house and the senate. we did welfare reform. we put the work back into welfare and it was tremendously successful. we decreased the welfare rolls. now, obama's reversed that. now we have it's gone up, the food stamp program now gone up from 28 million families to 47 million. that's just one of the things that can be reversed, that got news this mess to start with. >> gretchen: but senator, why does it appear -- and obviously the election was a result of it -- why does it appear that president obama wins the pr campaign on this entire discussion? >> well, gretchen, i represent oklahoma. he hasn't won up there. >> gretchen: but he's winning it acrossment country. >> well, i know, he's a very persuasive person. that doesn
penny to the deficit. we should put together something like a simpson/bowles commission. right now it's going to last for another 22 years untouched, but let's make sure it's stronger, longer. but when it comes to the other entitlement programs, medicare and medicaid, we've got to make certain that we preserve these basic programs, not to go the route of the paul ryan voucherizing, leaving senioring vulnerable for health insurance they cannot find or cannot afford. but make sure we change the program to save the money, reduce the increase in health care costs. medicaid is the one i'll add, joe, that concerns me the most. it has the least politically articulate constituency. these are the poorest people in america. we've got to make sure at the end of the day, we protect the children, mothers with babies, and particularly the frail elderly being covered by medicaid. we can make changes there and preserve the basic integrity of these programs. >> well, of course, people in medicaid don't have the aarp fighting for them day in and day out, running 30-second ads. isn't that one of the gre
to talk about comprehensive tax reform and talk about spending cuts and talk about debt and deficit reduction. pulling out an isolated piece like raising rates or taking a mortgage interest deduction or whatever it may be, it doesn't serve a purpose. you have to look at the entire problem. if you don't do that, we're all dead. >> where does norquist fit in? has your own view on the pledge evolved? >> i'm not for increasing tax rates. i'm for reforming the code, raising the base upon which those rates might be applied. i'm not for raising the rates. >> why is this attracting a -- why is revenue in general attracting the share of the debate? i heard complaints that say we're not giving due attention to reform, to entitlements. is it just that taxes are sexy, is that it? >> if the media would stop asking about it we could talk about comprehensive reform of entitlements and of spending. it's a complicated, complex process. if you pull out one part of it and have a debate over that part, you're redirecting america's focus from where it ought to be which is comprehensive reform of spendin
to reduce the deficit. the question is how to do it. this is an encouraging development. it suggests that republicans are slowly absorbing one of the lessons of the 2012 election which as elections continue to be wown wop in the middle and victory remains elusive for parties that occupy either the far left over the far right. over the years the democratic party has wrestled with the same issues republicans are facing. when i was elected to congress in 1981, crime was ripping apart my district district. i came to washington with a goal of working to pass new laws to crack down on crime. lo and behold i found the democratic congress at the time was literally outsourcing the drafting of crime legislation to the aclu. i have great respect for the views of civil libertarians but at that time the motto was -- quote -- "let a hundred guilty people foe free lest your convict one guilty person." that dominated our party's thinking on crime for better than a decade. our party suffered for it. we didn't standpoint snap out of it until president clinton passed the crime bill in the 1990's. after
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